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Services are different during the COVID -19 pandemic, to protect the public and staff, including appointment only services.

Please view Sandyford's  full COVID-19 statement and COVID- 19 service information page which is updated regularly. You must not attend for an appointment if you have signs of COVID or have been in contact with someone in the last 14 days who has. 

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Sexualisation

Sexualisation…what does it mean? Sexualisation as it’s referred to these days has a lot in common with sexual objectification.

Sexualisation is when people (usually girls and women) are looked at as sex objects and judged only on their physical appearance and sexiness.

Watch Laci Green talking about sexualisation in her vlog.

So it doesn’t matter how smart or funny or talented they are, the main thing they are judged on is how “hot” they look.

It can happen to guys, too, but study after study shows that women are portrayed as objectified and sexualised much more often than men.

After a while, girls and women can get influenced by these messages that are all around them day in and day out.

The messages can come from advertising, music videos, gaming, lad’s mags, pornography…but the underlying message is always the same, and it is “Your value as a person comes from how sexy and how hot you are.”

Are music videos sexist?

That’s obviously ridiculous, as girls and women have loads more to offer the world than what they look like. But it’s not surprising that sometimes girls and women buy into these really damaging views if that’s what they see all around them, and start to believe that it’s important, or even required, to present themselves as a sex object.

People we love

Malala Yousifazi - Activist.

A young woman who survived an attempt on her life and who is now an outspoken advocate of female rights and female education in the Middle East, Malala Yousifazi is the textbook-perfect example of a role model for young women and with good reason. Since moving to the UK to live and work, she has bravely spoken in the United Nations and continues to fight for girls to get an education in all corners of the globe.